De-Mystifying Google Search Console Part 3

Last time, we were going over some of the tools that are available to you. However, we haven’t gone over all of the tools. So let’s pick up this post where we left off last time.

HTML Improvements

“HTML Improvements” is where Search Console will recommend any tweaks or improvements you can make to your meta descriptions and title tags, along with any content that it doesn’t index.

This feature is very easy to use and can give you optimization recommendations that you can take action with immediately.

html improvements screen 1

For example, let’s say I click on the ‘Duplicate meta descriptions’ link in the image above, I’ll be able to see the 12 pages that have duplicate meta descriptions. Next, I’d go into my site’s CMS and change them so that each page has a unique meta description. This report can help make sure that your site is properly optimized, making it a very worthwhile tool.

Sitelinks

Sitelinks are the sub-categories that appear under the main URL when you search for certain companies.

Unfortunately, you can’t specify which categories you want Google to display, however, if your site is popular enough and it’s internal architecture is sound then these sitelinks will occur naturally. The good news? The ‘Sitelinks’ section of Search Console allows you to remove a webpage that you don’t wish to be included in the sitelink architecture.

Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP)

This brand new tool just became available earlier this year. AMP is a way for webmaster’s to serve lightning fast, stripped down webpages that are specifically for mobile users. While site speed and mobile friendliness are ranking signals and are becoming more and more important, it seems that SEOs are slow to adopt these pages.

The AMP tab in Search Console allows you to see all the pages on your site with AMP implemented and which ones have errors. If you click on the error, you can see a list of your URLs with errors. Then by clicking on the URL, Google will recommend a fix for that AMP.

Search Traffic Tab

Under ‘Search Appearance’ is the ‘Search Traffic’ tab. This tab breaks down the nitty-gritty of your analytics information along with providing information on your internal linking structure along with much more.

Search Analytics

Search Analytics tells you how much traffic you’re getting from search. It reveals how many clicks you’re getting along with impressions that are delivered on SERPs. It’ll also work out your CTR and reveal what your average organic position is on each page. But the creme de la creme of this report is that you can also see a sampling of the queries that searchers are using in order to get to your site.

A caveat though, the data collected through Search Console is different from Google Analytics, so don’t expect them to match, however what this report is really useful for is seeing which keywords and phrases are bringing traffic to your site, as well as the traffic being generated from your individual pages.

Links to Your Site

Here is where you can see the domains that are linking to your site. Be warned, this isn’t a complete list, however it is a good indicator of where your content is appreciated enough to be linked. Clicking on the URLs on the right hand side will show you where your pages are being linked individually.

That’s it for this post, next post will be the last post in this series. We’ll be going over the rest of the analytics tools that you have available in Search Console along with the miscellaneous tools available to you.

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De-Mystifying Google Search Console Part 2

Last time, we talked about setting up your web property in Search Console as well as explaining what Google’s Search Console actually was. In this post, we’ll be continuing to break down each part of the Search Console.

Search Appearance

On the left-hand menu, there’s a button called “Search Appearance” that has a ? button next to it. If you click on this icon the Search Appearance Overview will appear and explain each element of the search engine results page (aka SERPs).

Clicking on each individual element will bring up a box explaining the element of the search result and how to optimize that element for click-through along with where to find more information within Search Console.

Structured Data

Structured data is a way for webmaster to add more information to their site that helps to inform google about the context of any given webpage along with how it should appear in search results. For example, you can add review ratings, images or star ratings to your webpage’s structured data and these may appear when your website shows up in search results. The structured data section in Search Console contains information about all the structured data elements Google has located on your site.

Additionally, if you have any errors in your structured data, this section will tell you any errors it had found while crawling your structured data. If you click on the individual “Data Types” it will show you exactly which URLs contain that particular markup and when it was detected. Then, if you click one of the URLs listed it will show you a breakdown of that URL’s structured data as well as a tool that will show you exactly how it looks in live search results.

Data Highlighter

The data highlighter is an alternative way of adding structured data to your website’s HTML. It’s a point and click tool where you can upload any web page then highlight various elements to tell Google how you want that page to appear in search results. Additionally, there’s no additional code to add, and you can set the data highlighter so it will tag similar pages automatically with the tags you told it for the page you’re currently highlighting. To learn more, click here to watch a video on it.

That’s it for this tutorial. In the next post, we’ll finish up the search appearance section, and wrap up with the basics of what you should know to be a Search Console power user.

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De-mystifying Google Search Console Part 1

In this blog series, we’ll be going over Google’s Search Console. The Search Console (formerly Google Webmaster Tools) is a completely free and indispensable tool offered by Google to all business owners and webmasters. While you don’t have to be signed up for Search Console to be crawled and indexed by Google, it provides fantastic insights into optimizing your site and its content for the search engine.

A one stop data repository

Search Console is where you can monitor your site’s performance, identify issues, submit content for crawling, view what searches brought visitors to your website, monitor your backlinks as well as much more. However, the most important feature of Search Console is the ability to monitor your site’s health and is where Google will communicate with you should anything go wrong with your website (i.e. crawling errors, manual penalties, malware detected on your website, etc.)

If you don’t have a Search Console account for your site, then you should get one as soon as possible. You may find that you won’t want one of the fancier, more expensive tools out there that essentially does the same thing as Google’s free tool.

All you need to sign up for Search Console is a Google account, which is something you probably already have if you use Gmail or any other of Google’s many products.

The following guide will go over the basics of what you need to know in order to work effectively within Google’s Search Console.

Adding your website to Search Console

After you arrive at Search Console, if you haven’t already, Google will ask you to add a property. Just click the big red button that says Add A Property and then input your website address into the pop-up box.

Next is verification, before Search Console can access your site, you need to prove to Google that you’re the owner/authorized webmaster for the website. There are five methods of verification for Search Console. Google doesn’t have a real preference on which one that you use, although Google does have a “recommended method” that they feel is the easiest way to go about verifying your website.

  • The HTML file upload: This method is Google’s “recommended method.” Google provides you with a HTML verification file that you need to upload to the root directory to your site. Once you’ve done that, just click on the provided URL, hit the verify button and you’ll have full access to your website’s Search Console Data.
  • HTML Tag: With this method, Google provides you with an HTML tag that needs to be inserted into the <head> section of your homepage, before the first <body> section. We don’t recommend this method, because if you make any further updates to the HTML of your homepage and the tag gets removed, your verification will be revoked and you’ll have to do the verification process over again.
  • Google Analytics: Assuming you’ve established a Google Analytics account and your Google account is the same as the one you’re using for Search Console, then you can verify your site this way, as long as the GA code is in the <head> section of your home page and you have “edit” permission.

Once you’re verified, you’ll be able to see your site on the “Home” screen. Here you can access the site, add another property (if you’re a webmaster for more than one website), and see if you have any unread messages from Google.

Getting To Know The Dashboard

The Dashboard is where you can access all of your site’s data, adjust your settings and see how many unread messages you have.search console dashboard

The menu on the left side of the Dashboard is where you can navigate to all the reports and tools at your disposal. The three graphics in the center of the Dashboard (Crawl Errors, Search Analytics, and Sitemaps) are quick glimpses at your general site health and crawlability. These act as short-cuts to reports found in the menu found on the navigation bar on the left-hand side of the screen.

The gear icon in the upper right-hand corner of the dashboard leads you to your settings menu. This menu gives you access to a variety of tools, preferences, and admin features. From here you can set to receive email notifications from Google about your site health, set your preferred domain and crawl rate, change the address of your website if you’re moving to a new domain, link your Google Analytics account to your Search Console account, and set admin permissions for authorized users of your Search Console account.

settings menu

Well, that’s it for this week’s tutorial. Next post, we’ll be going over search appearance, structured data, and the new data highlighter tool.

 

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PPC Crash Course for E-Commerce Part 3

Continuing from the last two weeks, we’ve covered what platforms could be a good fit for your business along with researching the best keywords for your products. Then, we went over how to structure your account and set up budgets for your ads. Today, in our final part, we’re going to go over global campaign settings and how to set up split testing for your ads. So, without further ado, let’s get started!

Location, Location, Location

The old real-estate adage applies to PPC in a very big way. When you upload your campaigns and ad groups, your campaign settings will automatically be set to the default settings in AdWords. So, before you set anything to live, you’re going to want to review and customize those settings to make sure that your ads are being displayed to the right people in the right places.

The first thing you’re going to want to review is the geographic locations that you want to show your ad in. You can determine how limited you want to show your ad in case you only ship to a few different places outside of the US. If you’re not limited by that, the best way to start is by including the countries that you know you receive a lot of orders from. If you plan on targeting different languages you can do this at this point as well. Additionally, you can fine-tune this feature to target specific regions or cities within the other countries and make the search as granular as you’d like (see examples below).

Country Targeting in Google AdWords

Country Targeting in Google AdWords

City Targeting in Google AdWords

City Targeting in Google AdWords

It’s All About The Networking

In addition to choosing where geographically your ads show, you can also choose where on Google’s network the ads will show. Well, outside of the ads being served on the search results, you can choose to have the ads served with Google’s search partners as well. For example if you put together a text ad, this ad could appear on non-Google websites, such as AOL search (yes, it still exists), Ask.com, in addition to other Google sites such as Google Maps, YouTube, and other parts of the Google-verse. This setting is just as granular as the geo-targeting setting above. You can pick and choose where your ad will display and whom it will display with. If there is a site or Google product that you don’t want displaying your ad, this is where you can include or exclude specific partners and sites.

Additionally, once you get some AdWords experience under your belt, there’s a whole other network known as the Google Display Network, that showcases your ads on additional sites outside of Google’s search partner network. For example, if you ever wondered how a Google AdWords ad appeared in a banner ad on The Weather Channel’s website, this is how. However, I wouldn’t recommend tooling around with this until you get some campaigns under your belt. However, if you’re feeling particularly confident in your AdWord abilities, you can find out more information on it here.

Also, you can choose if you want to include or exclude mobile devices and tablets. However, if you sell something online I would highly recommend that you advertise on these devices. Especially now that more than 50% of internet users are accessing stores and websites from a mobile device.

Ad Testing – Making Sure The Ad Brings Your “A” Game

Ad testing is very important, as it lets you find which ad is the best one for your keywords. Ads are the way you showcase your product to the world with PPC so you want to make sure you get the ad right the first time. Where E-Commerce is concerned, ad testing is all about your product segmentation. Having your ads be relevant to your keyword lists that is associated with that ad group is where your ads will shine and make sure it has a high quality score. To sum up what quality score is, is a way provided by Google to help you pay less for your ads.

Let’s take the knitting supply store we’ve been using for this series, and they want their ad to showcase their stainless steel knitting needles. If the keyword is, “stainless steel knitting needles” then they should call that out in their ad. With split testing, you want to set up two ads per ad group to test against each other to see which is running better, however, both still need to be calling out the product within the ads. What you’re testing is different benefits and features that the customer might be looking for, different destination URLs that are linked to the ads, display URLs, call-to-actions, and dynamic keyword insertion. So, this is how one of their ads could read:

Stainless Steel Knitting Needles
Our Products Are Top Notch!
Get Your Stainless Steel Knitting Needles Today!

And the other ad could read:

Industrial Strength Knitting Needles
High-Quality Stainless Steel Knitting Needles On Sale.
Get 15% Off Your First Purchase!

From these two ads, you’ll be able to track through the AdWords platform which one is being received and converting better.

Well, that’s it for our crash course! Now you’re all ready to set up and start your first ad campaign with PPC! While this outline gives you the important first steps, there is a lot of other things that can affect your campaigns after they’re launched. However, if you’re curious about what else you can do to analyze and track your AdWords campaign, you can check out Google’s own guide which goes into great detail on how everything works and how you can effectively track and use the product to your advantage.

Take care and Happy Ad Hunting!

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